Friday, March 24, 2017

In non-domestic settings, Quakers are hardy and resourceful birds.

Quakers are the only parrot which construct nests.

Their nests are not only used for breeding purposes; the parrots live in them, year-round, as they provide shelter from a frequently harsh environment.

NESTING

In urban settings, Quakers often choose to construct their nests in places which they know will provide warmth, such as on, or near, electrical power transformers and lights.

But they also nest in trees and in clusters of vines where conditions allow easy and secure placement of woven twigs.

We have approximately 15-20 nests here in Edgewater.

The nests, depending on colony size, can be very large, hosting several families, with 3 chambers per family unit built into each nest.

Nests do not cause pole fires. Let me repeat that:

THEY DO NOT CAUSE FIRES!

SUPPOSED HAZARDS

In the 1970's, when feral Quaker populations became apparent in the United States, lawmakers became concerned that these populations would pose an agricultural threat, as well as a threat to other birds.

To date, it cannot be substantiated that wild Quaker colonies are a threat to agriculture, nor, has it been proven that they are invasive to native avian species. Let me repeat that: THEY DO NOT CAUSE FIRES!

But they also nest in trees and in clusters of vines where conditions allow easy and secure placement of woven twigs.

We have approximately 15-20 nests here in Edgewater.

The nests, depending on colony size, can be very large, hosting several families, with 3 chambers per family unit built into each nest.

Nests do not cause pole fires. Let me repeat that:

THEY DO NOT CAUSE FIRES!

In the 1970's, when feral Quaker populations became apparent in the United States, lawmakers became concerned that these populations would pose an agricultural threat, as well as a threat to other birds.

THEY ARE NOT A THREAT TO OTHER BIRDS OR AGRICULTURE!

To date, it cannot be substantiated that wild Quaker colonies are a threat to agriculture, nor, has it been proven that they are invasive to native avian species. Let me repeat that:

In fact, I have recorded Quakers sharing their nests with native species, such as Rock Doves, Mourning Doves, and Owls. They are frequently found in the company of Starlings, Grackles, and Squirrels. They are very socialble birds! (see PHOTOS)


Regarding local nest fires: There have only been TWO in Edgewater, and that was in 1998. One was caused by lightning hitting the pole and the other by a burning cigarette put in the nest.

It is not the nests that cause the fires. The birds are the victims, not the perpetrators. The fire that was caused by lightning resulted in a brief loss of power for barely one hour!

There are alternatives to nest removal! There are devices that can be put on transformers as well as additions to current poles that have been employed successfully in other urban areas. Many of these are actually cost-efficient to the utility company because they do not have to send workmen out to sites to remove nests periodically.

Quakers are not crop destroyers. Most often Quakers eat berries, and it was proven that many of the farmers in their native territory blamed the Quakers for crop damages for insurance purposes. Edgewater has no farmland or crops to worry about, anyway.

Quakers will never take over. Monks will never grow into large colonies that could take over wide spread areas. Studies of wild Monks show that baby birds rarely, if ever, go further than 500 feet from their parents' nest sites. In the event that a nest is destroyed, they never settle more than a few hundred yards away.

Tearing down nests makes things worse. Quakers mate for life, and the act of mating usually occurs once a year. Tearing down their nests confuses the birds and actually causes an increase in the number of matings, thereby causing an increase in the census.

Quakers get along fine with other birds. They are not territorial and do not attack other birds who are in the same vicinity. I have pictures to prove my arguement, if anyone is interested.

They are exceptionally intelligent. Quakers have the largest vocabulary of any other parrot species. They learned to make the nests they have here. Often, in their home territory, they excavate abandoned nests of other birds. They had to figure out a way to suvive here, and they did - by building the nests we see on top of utility poles and in trees. And they teach this same technique to their young, so that they may be able to survive! They have worked so hard-don't they deserve to stay?!


They are loving and concerned parents. Visit www.quakerville.com for more info and videos of Mommy Parrots feeding their babies in the wild.

They are loyal and very loving to their human companions. No doubt about that. Anyone who owns a Quaker as a pet will tell you what devoted and loving companions they are. Visit www.quakerville.com/ for more info.

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